Neologisms

Research areas:
Year:
2006
Type of Publication:
In Book
Keywords:
Acronyms Blends, Overlap of Letters/Sounds Blends, Types Of Combining Forms Compounds, Verb-Headed Internet Sources for Neologisms Prefixes Splinters Suffixes
Authors:
  • Lehrer, A.
Editor:
Keith, Brown
Pages:
590-593
Publisher:
Elsevier
Address:
Oxford
BibTex:
Abstract:
The growth of vocabulary in languages has accelerated in recent years. In English, some word formation processes which were previously marginal (namely blends, combining forms, and verb-headed compounds) have become common. Blends, based on underlying compounds, have a part of one word or parts of both words omitted. The part (splinter) has given rise to new morphemes. Examples are -holic and -thon, forms which have spawned dozens of neologisms. Although many neologisms are nonce forms which will not enter the language, many will become permanent. New products and processes, various types of wordplay, and the Internet have inspired a wealth of new words.